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There is a serious question underneath that joke.  There have been times in the past when doctors were a major cause of sickness and death.  (Consider Semmelweis' discovery that doctors were causing puerperal fever.)  Someone from another planet might conclude that doctors and hospitals actually caused the conditions they treat. 

The modern problem is to find objective means of measuring effectiveness of medical treatment without assuming it must be positive, simply because no one involved is trying to cause sickness and death.  Because doctors are paid for treatment, not health, there is an enormous bias in current practice and statistics. 
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http://www.investinme.org/IIME%20AB.htm

Invest in ME Research Advisory Board


Invest in ME supports high quality, biomedical research into myalgic
encephalomyelitis (ME).

Following this year's research meetings and in order to ensure that we
build a strategy of high-quality biomedical research for the future
IiME have decided to form an Advisory Board of top researchers to
assist us in planning and building a strategy of high quality
biomedical research into ME. We hope this will allow more focus on
research required to find the pathomechanism of the disease.

The Invest in ME Research Advisory  Board

Our Advisory Board consists of the following members -

Dr Ian Gibson- Former Dean of Biological Sciences, UEA
Professor Jonathan Edwards- Emeritus Professor of Connective Tissue
Medicine University College London (UCL)
Dr Jo Cambridge- Senior Lecturer UCL
Professor Angela Vincent- Emeritus Professor of Neuroimmunology,
University of Oxford
Professor Tom Wileman-  Professor of Infection & Immunity
Professor Simon Carding- Leader, Gut Health and Food Safety Programme
Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park

The first advisory board meeting was held on Thursday 28 September
2014 in London.

The meeting discussed what we know about ME so far, the progress of
the UCL B cell study and UEA gut microbiota research and the aims of
these projects in, for example, identifying sub groups of patients and
how the research Invest in ME is funding at the moment can be tied
together to complement each other.

There was consensus that the most difficult part for researchers is to
find correctly diagnosed patients and they rely on clinicians to do
the selection process. It was discussed how there are probably very
many low lying patients who have this disease but are outside of the
healthcare system - something IiME has pointed out many times in the
past - and it would be useful to identify those patients and enable
them to be part of research efforts.

Together we are working on establishing the correct and unbiased
science to be involved in ME research.

A number of key areas and possible projects have already been identified.

We shall be working together with our board over the coming months to
initiate these projects.

Our supporters have made wonderful efforts to enable a solid base of
research to be made possible and we welcome support for our plans. We
will publicise more on these projects as soon as we are able to do so.

We believe our approach to initiating biomedical research into ME is
paying off and feel very strongly that the key elements of a correct
and productive strategy of research into ME are or have been created.
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http://medicinex.stanford.edu/2014/08/04/announcing-global-access-program-2014/

Stanford Medicine X, the Intersection of Medicine and Emerging Technologies

We’re proud to announce the return of our Global Access Program at Medicine X Conference 2014!

The Global Access Program brings high-quality streaming video of the conference plenary proceedings, live photos, and other updates to your desktop, phone, or tablet device.

This free service allows ePatients, academic scholars and students to participate in the conference from any location.

The Global Access Program provides all content from the Plenary Hall sessions, but does not include coverage of breakout sessions, workshops, Master Classes, or the IDEO Design Challenge.

globalaccess height=227

The Global Access team is led by Emmy-award winning television producer Bita Nikravesh Ryan and 2013 Stanford-NBC Global Health Media fellow Hayley Goldbach. Our photography team includes Academy Award-winning documentary filmmaker Theo Rigby, speaker portrait photographer Christopher Kern, and our special venues photographer Yuto Wantanabe.

This year’s Global Access team also welcomes inventor and cancer researcher Jack Andraka.

To participate in the Global Access Program, simply create an account on the Stanford Medicine X online community and register for the 2014 Global Access Program. This will allow us to contact you with access details when the conference gets underway.

Additionally, this year Global Access viewers may support the livestream by making a small donation. To donate, simply choose one of the options on the registration page.

About Medicine X         SEPTEMBER 5-7, 2014

 Medicine X is a catalyst for new ideas about the future of medicine and health care. The Medicine X initiative is designed to explore the potential of social media and information technology to advance the practice of medicine, improve health, and empower patients to be active participants in their own care. The “X” is meant to evoke a move beyond numbers and trends—it represents the infinite possibilities for current and future information technologies to improve health. Under the direction of Dr. Larry Chu, Associate Professor of Anesthesia, Medicine X is a project of the Stanford AIM Lab.

 Join our growing network today and keep posted on the latest news and progress about Stanford Medicine X!

4
General Discussion / Don't Catch What Ails Your House, 9/1/2014
« Last post by Patricia on Today at 05:59:54 AM »
 http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/09/01/dont-catch-what-ails-your-house/
 
 Don’t Catch What Ails Your House


By JANE E. BRODY

September 1, 2014 12:01 am

 In 1982, my husband and I bought a vacation home in the foothills of the Catskills. The inspector who checked out the property failed to note three critical facts: The house had three flat roofs (in snow country), no drainage from the muddy crawl space and no insulation under the floors.

In a few years, ours had become a “sick” house, with mini-lakes on sagging roofs, wet insulation underneath and a small pond in the crawl space. All of it contributed to rampant mold inside the house.

More:   http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/09/01/dont-catch-what-ails-your-house/

 

 
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General Discussion / Sinead O’Connor’s Fibromyalgia 9/1/2014
« Last post by Patricia on Today at 05:32:26 AM »
http://www.theepochtimes.com/n3/928224-sinead-oconnors-fibromyalgia/

Sinead O’Connor’s Fibromyalgia   

By Dr. Gabe Mirkin, www.drmirkin.com | September 1, 2014

27      (Shutterstock*) height=450(Shutterstock*)

 Sinead O’Connor is an Irish singer and songwriter who became famous in the late 1980s and has been a strong moralist, speaking out against war and against the abuse of women and children. Her career has been interrupted by bipolar disorder and fibromyalgia. In the spring of 2012, she appeared on her way back from illness with a the release of a UK Top 40 album, but then cancelled an extensive European tour because of her health issues.

 Her Childhood of Abuse

Sinead Marie Bernadette O’Connor was born on December 8, 1966. Her parents married in their teens, fought all the time and separated when she was eight. She was one of the three children who went to live with their mother, and she claims that she was beaten frequently by her mother. She wrote her famous hit song, “Fire on Babylon” to tell the world about her own abuse as a child, and she has been a persistent advocate for abused children. In Ireland at that time, the mother almost always kept the children, no matter how incompetent or unfit she was.

In 1979, at age 13, she ran away from her mother and went to live with her father and his new wife. At age 15, she skipped school repeatedly and was caught shoplifting. She was sent for 18 months to a Magdalene Asylum, run by the Order of Our Lady of Charity. She says: “We were just children really . . . the girls cried every day. It was a prison. We didn’t see our families, we were locked in, cut off from life, and deprived of a normal childhood. We were told we were there because we were bad people. Some of the girls had been raped at home and not believed. One girl was in because she had a bad hip and her family didn’t know what to do with her.”

Survivors of these church-run institutions complained of incredible emotional and sexual abuse. One survivor testified her mother called the police after she was raped, the police came and arrested her, and a judge sentenced her to hard labor in the Magdalene Laundry. Sinead O’Connor claims that memories of her stay at the Magdalene Laundry there are one of the reasons that she tore up a picture of the Pope on “Saturday Night Live” in 1992.

Her rebellious nature got her in constant trouble, but she did learn to sing and write songs. She stated that: “I’ve got to say that music saved me. I didn’t have any other abilities, and there was no learning support for girls like me. It was either jail or music. I got lucky.”

 Father to the Rescue

In 1983, at age 17, her father enrolled her in a Quaker boarding School in Waterford. While there, she recorded her first album. She dropped out of school to join a band and moved to Dublin. In February 10, 1985, she appeared to be devastated by the death of her mother in a car accident and quit the band and moved to London. At age 20, a drummer in her band, John Reynolds, got her pregnant. At that time, she adopted her trademark shaved head, angry expressions and drab clothing. She lived mostly between London and Los Angeles. In 1992 she returned to Dublin to help raise her six-year old son, Jake, and in 1995 quit her band because she was again pregnant and crippled by painful bouts of fibromyalgia.

 Four Marriages

 O’Connor has four marriages, four children with four different fathers, and four divorces. She was married to:

 • Music producer John Reynolds,
 • Journalist Nicholas Sommerlad,
 • Musician Steve Cooney,
 • Drug counselor Barry Herridge, met on the internet
 She also had a relationship and a child with musician Frank Bonadio.

 A Dedicated Moralist

She has had the courage to speak out on everything that bothers her. She was a staunch defender of women’s rights and was ordained as a priest even though women are not allowed to be ordained and are not recognized by the standard Roman Catholic church. She is a pacifist against all wars, most notably the U.S. involvement in Iraq.

In 2009 the Irish Government released the “Ryan Report” on abuse in church-run institutions, which stated that “the children were treated like slaves, or inmates, stripped of even the most basic of human rights.” The Irish government apologized to the tens of thousands of victims who suffered under the institutions run by the church and offered damages to victims in the amount of £1billion.

 Health Issues

O’Connor was diagnosed with bipolar disorder at age 37 and her severe muscle pain was diagnosed as fibromyalgia. She had attempted suicide at age 33. Bipolar disorder is characterized by wide mood swings, a high manic phase, when a person thinks she can do everything, to a low depressive phase when they can do almost nothing.

Nobody knows what causes bipolar disorder. It can be genetic, but often is not. It certainly is often associated with an unhappy childhood, particularly in those who have suffered physical or sexual abuse. It usually starts between ages 15 and 24 and persists throughout a lifetime.

 People with bipolar disorder are at high risk for abusing tobacco, alcohol, and drugs. Ms. O’Connor has been a heavy smoker.

Manic symptoms:

 • Unusually high, overly happy or outgoing moods
 • Having an unrealistic belief in abilities
 • Talking very fast
 • Jumping from one idea to another
 • Racing thoughts
 • Being unusually distracted
 • Increased activity, such as taking on multiple new projects
 • Being overly restless
 • Sleeping little or not feeling tired
 • Extreme irritability
 • Behaving impulsively
 • Engaging in high-risk behaviors.

Depressive symptoms:

 • Having problems concentrating, remembering, and making decisions
 • Loss of interest in activities once enjoyed, including sex
 • Being restless or irritable
 • Unexplained changes in eating, sleeping, or other habits
 • Thinking of death or suicide, or attempting suicide
 • An overly long period of feeling sad or hopeless

 How Is Bipolar Disorder Diagnosed?

There is no laboratory test to diagnose bipolar disorder, so the diagnosis is based on a physician’s opinion and it can often be wrong. People with bipolar disorder can have long periods of being perfectly normal, but they will always be at risk of having recurrences of high or low feelings. Since bipolar disorder usually lasts a lifetime, nobody should ever be given that diagnosis unless he or she has suffered crippling, persistent mood swings. Since drugs and psychotherapy help this condition, it is essential not to miss a proper diagnosis. People with bipolar disorder are at increased risk for thyroid disease, migraine headaches, heart disease, diabetes and obesity.

 Fibromyalgia

The term Fibromyalgia means severe pain in muscles and joints that has no known cause. If a cause is found the patient is given some other diagnosis such as Lyme disease or an auto-immune disease. If you suffer from severe, persistent pain in multiple muscles and joints, your doctor will order a large number of tests to rule out all of the known causes. If all of the tests come back normal, your doctor should tell that there is no known reason for your pain, but most doctors don’t do that. They prefer to tell you that you have fibromyalgia, which just means that there is no explanation for your pain and no specific treatment. They do the same thing with people who are exhausted. When doctors can’t find a cause for extreme fatigue, they call it chronic fatigue syndrome, which means that they don’t know why you are so tired.

Some cases of fibromyalgia or chronic fatigue syndrome are caused by inadequately treated Lyme disease and can be cured with long- term antibiotics. Some cases are caused by chlamydia, mycoplasma or ureaplasma infections which are usually sexually transmitted and are very difficult to diagnose, but also may be cured with long-term antibiotics. If you or someone you know has been diagnosed with fibromyalgia or chronic fatigue syndrome, be sure that the doctor has checked for this type of chronic hidden infection. See http://drmirkin.com/morehealth/g115.html

Usually people with fibromyalgia are left with more questions than answers and can spend many years of suffering while they wait for more effective treatments. NIH maintains a good source of information to help you keep up to date on the research and possible future treatments at http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/fibromyalgia.html On Bipolar disorder, see http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/bipolardisorder.html
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http://www.sciencealert.com.au/news/20140109-26106.html

All of Richard Feynman’s physics lectures are now available free online

Fiona MacDonald         
Monday, 01 September 2014   

 You can now learn physics from Nobel Prize-winner Richard Feynman’s legendary lectures.
 RichardFeynman height=400  Image: io9   Richard Feynman was something of a rockstar in the physics world, and his lectures at Caltech in the early 1960s were legendary.


As Robbie Gonzalez reports for io9, footage of these lectures exists, but they were most famously preserved in a three-volume collection of books called The Feynman Lectures - which has arguably become the most popular collection of physics books ever written.

And now you can access the entire collection online for free.

The Feynman Lectures on Physics have been made available as part of a collaboration between Caltech and The Feynman Lectures Website, and io9 reports they have been designed to be viewed, equations and all, on any device.

The lectures were targeted at first-year university physics students, but they were attended by many graduates and researchers, and even those with a lot of prior physics understanding will be able to get something out of them.

And even if you're a physics novice (like me), you can still marvel at the fantastic teaching and amazing science. Like Feynman said: “Physics is like sex: sure, it may give some practical results, but that's not why we do it.”

Now stop wasting time online and go and learn from one of the greatest minds in physics.
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http://www.freepatentsonline.com/y2014/0242033.html

GENE THERAPY VECTORS AND CYTOSINE DEAMINASES                                 

Document Type and Number: United States Patent Application 20140242033

 Inventors:

  Gruber, Harry E. (Rancho Santa Fe, CA, US)               
 Jolly, Douglas J. (Encinitas, CA, US)               
 Perez, Omar D. (San Diego, CA, US)               
 Logg, Christopher R. (South Pasadena, CA, US)               

    Application Number: 14/274556

   Publication Date: 08/28/2014

   Filing Date: 05/09/2014

   View Patent Images:  Download PDF 20140242033                        PDF help   
  Assignee: Tocagen Inc. (San Diego, CA, US)               
 
What is claimed is:

 1.  A recombinant replication competent retrovirus (RCR) comprising: a retroviral GAG protein; a retroviral POL protein; a retroviral envelope; a retroviral polynucleotide comprising Long-Terminal Repeat (LTR) sequences at the 3′ end of the retroviral polynucleotide, a promoter sequence at the 5′ end of the retroviral polynucleotide, said promoter being suitable for expression in a mammalian cell, a gag nucleic acid domain, a pol nucleic acid domain and an env nucleic acid domain; a cassette comprising an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) operably linked to a human codon optimized heterologous nucleic acid encoding a polypeptide having cytosine deaminase activity, wherein the cassette is positioned 5′ to the 3′ LTR and 3′ to the env nucleic acid domain encoding the retroviral envelope; and cis-acting sequences necessary for reverse transcription, packaging and integration in a target cell.                   

 2.  The RCR of claim 1, wherein the retroviral polynucleotide is derived from murine leukemia virus (MLV), Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV), Feline leukemia Virus or Gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV).                   

 3.  The RCR of claim 2, wherein the MLV is an amphotropic MLV.                   

 4.  The RCR of claim 1, wherein the retrovirus is a gammaretrovirus.                   

 5.  The RCR of claim 1, wherein the target cell is a cancer cell.                   

 6.  The RCR of claim 5, wherein the cancer is selected from the group consisting of lung cancer, colon-rectum cancer, breast cancer, prostate cancer, urinary tract cancer, uterine cancer, brain cancer, head and neck cancer, pancreatic cancer, melanoma, stomach cancer and ovarian cancer, rheumatoid arthritis or other auto-immune disease.                   

 7.  The RCR according to claim 1, wherein the promoter sequence comprises a tissue-specific promoter sequence.

 8.  The RCR according to claim 1, wherein the promoter comprises a CMV promoter having a sequence as set forth in SEQ ID NO:19, 20, or 22 from nucleotide 1 to about nucleotide 582 and may include modification to one or more nucleic acid bases and which is capable of directing and initiating transcription.                   

 9.  The RCR of claim 1, wherein the promoter comprises a sequence as set forth in SEQ ID NO:19 or 20 from nucleotide 1 to about nucleotide 582.                   

 10.  The RCR of claim 1, wherein the promoter comprises a CMV-R-U5 domain polynucleotide.                   

 11.  The RCR of claim 10, wherein the CMV-R-U5 domain comprise the immediately early promoter from human cytomegalovirus linked to an MLV R-U5 region.                   

 12.  The RCR of claim 11, wherein the CMV-R-U5 domain polynucleotide comprises a sequence as set forth in SEQ ID NO:19, 20, or 22 from about nucleotide 1 to about nucleotide 1202 or sequences that are at least 95% identical to a sequence as set forth in SEQ ID NO:19, 20, or 22, wherein the polynucleotide promotes transcription of a nucleic acid molecule operably linked thereto.                   

 13.  The RCR of claim 1, wherein the gag of the polynucleotide is derived from a gammaretrovirus.                   

 14.  The RCR of claim 13, wherein the gag nucleic acid domain comprises a sequence from about nucleotide number 1203 to about nucleotide 2819 of SEQ ID NO: 19 or a sequence having at least 95%, 98%, 99% or 99.8% identity thereto.                   

 15.  The RCR of claim 1, wherein the pol domain of the polynucleotide is derived from a gammaretrovirus.

 16.  The RCR of claim 15, wherein the pol domain comprises a sequence from about nucleotide number 2820 to about nucleotide 6358 of SEQ ID NO:19 or a sequence having at least 95%, 98%, 99% or 99.9% identity thereto.                   

 17.  The RCR of claim 1, wherein the env domain comprises a sequence from about nucleotide number 6359 to about nucleotide 8323 of SEQ ID NO:19 or a sequence having at least 95%, 98%, 99% or 99.8% identity thereto.                   

 18.  The RCR of claim 1, wherein the IRES is derived from an encephalomyocarditis virus.                   

 19.  The RCR of claim 18, wherein the IRES comprises a sequence from about nucleotide number 8327 to about nucleotide 8876 of SEQ ID NO:19 or a sequence having at least 95%, 98%, or 99% identity thereto.                   

 20.  The RCR of claim 23, wherein the heterologous nucleic acid comprises a sequence as set forth in SEQ ID NO: 19 from about nucleotide number 8877 to about 9353.                   

 21.  The retrovirus of claim 1, wherein the 3′ LTR is derived from a gammaretrovirus.                   

 22.  The retrovirus of claim 21, wherein the 3′ LTR comprises a U3-R-U5 domain.                   

 23.  The retrovirus of claim 22, wherein the 3′ LTR comprises a sequence as set forth in SEQ ID NO:19 from about nucleotide 9405 to about 9998 or a sequence that is at least 95%, 98% or 99.5% identical thereto.                   

 24.  A method of treating a cell proliferative disorder in a subject comprising contacting the subject with a retrovirus of claim 1, and contacting the subject with 5-fluorocytosine.

 25.  A recombinant replication competent retrovirus comprising a retroviral polynucleotide comprising a sequence selected from SEQ ID NO:19, 20 and 22 encapsidated in a viral particle.

BACKGROUND

The yeast, or bacterial, cytosine deaminase converts the innocuous antibiotic pro-drug 5-FC into the cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Humans (and mammals in general) are not known to possess a naturally occurring gene encoding an enzyme with significant cytosine deaminase activity. Yeast and bacterial cytosine deaminase have gained recognition in the treatment of cancers using gene delivery and viral vectors for the delivery of the enzyme followed by treatment with 5-FC, which is then converted by the enzyme to a cytotoxic drug (Miller et al., Can Res 62:773-780 2002; Kievit et al., Can Res 59:1417-1421 1999).

From the SUMMARY

(snip)

The disclosure provides a recombinant replication competent retrovirus (RCR) comprising recombinant replication competent retrovirus, wherein the vector infects the target multiple times leading to a mean of 5 or more copies of the retrovirus genome. The multiple copies provide a “super” infection useful for gene delivery and protein production in vivo and in vitro. In one embodiment, the recombinant replication competent retrovirus (RCR) comprises: a retroviral GAG protein; a retroviral POL protein; a retroviral envelope; a retroviral polynucleotide comprising Long-Terminal Repeat (LTR) sequences at the 3′ end of the retroviral polynucleotide sequence, a promoter sequence at the 5′ end of the retroviral polynucleotide, said promoter being suitable for expression in a mammalian cell, a gag nucleic acid domain, a pol nucleic acid domain and an env nucleic acid domain; a cassette comprising an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) operably linked to a cytosine deaminase polynucleotide of the disclosure, wherein the cassette is positioned 5′ to the 3′ LTR and 3′ to the env nucleic acid domain encoding the retroviral envelope; and cis-acting sequences necessary for reverse transcription, packaging and integration in a target cell, wherein the RCR maintains higher replication competency after 6 passages compared to a pACE vector (SEQ ID NO:21).

In one embodiment, the retroviral polynucleotide sequence is derived from murine leukemia virus (MLV), Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV), Feline leukemia virus (FeLV), Baboon endogenous retrovirus (BEV), porcine endogenous virus (PERV), the cat derived retrovirus RD114, squirrel monkey retrovirus, Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV), avian reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV), or Gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV).



Therefore this is an unexpected and surprising result that confirms the in vivo tumor model data of Examples 30 and 31.

More particularly, the data demonstrate that this virus allows multiple super-infections in the great majority of the cells it infects, unlike normal MLV infection.

The experiments described here also provide a method of testing a recombinant replication competent retrovirus for the property of multiple infections of a target cell population.


More:  http://www.freepatentsonline.com/y2014/0242033.html
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I think one could write a tongue-in-cheek research paper on the correlation between time under the care of MDs and morbidity and mortality which would show a huge correlation without actually lying about any data.  Proposed title:  "Morbidity and Mortality as a Function of Time Spent under Supervision of Medicae Doctores".  I'm pretty sure this would reveal they are worse than smoking. 

Anciendaze .  .  .  this is a gooood one!! ;)
9
I think one could write a tongue-in-cheek research paper on the correlation between time under the care of MDs and morbidity and mortality which would show a huge correlation without actually lying about any data.  Proposed title:  "Morbidity and Mortality as a Function of Time Spent under Supervision of Medicae Doctores".  I'm pretty sure this would reveal they are worse than smoking. 
10
Roger on that, Rachel, going on record (will it become 'permanent' record ? .  .  .   it is in DISagreement).  Remember who the researcher is working for and who is paying the tab--and they want participants--so there will also be a 'sell job.'

Take good care, Rachel.


As Parisian says it well again .  .  .

Lunatics


There are LUNATICS & CRAZZZIES driving this bus.  When will they ever learn ?  Such verrry verrrry SHORT-sightedness.  Such a CRIME against HUMANITY!   >:( :( >:(  

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